Tony Hoagland

Known for humor and acerbic wit, Anthony Dey Hoagland’s books of poetry include Sweet Ruin (1992), which was chosen for the Brittingham Prize in Poetry and won the Zacharis Award from Emerson College; Donkey Gospel (1998), winner of the James Laughlin Award;  What Narcissism Means to Me (2003), a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award; Rain (2005); and Unincorporated Persons in the Late Honda Dynasty (2010). He has also published a collection of essays about poetry, Real Sofistakashun (2006).

He has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center, O.B. Hardison Prize for Poetry and Teaching from the Folger Shakespeare Library, the Poetry Foundation’s Mark Twain Award and the Jackson Poetry Prize from Poets & Writers. 

Tony Hoagland’s father was an Army doctor, and Hoagland grew up on various military bases throughout the South. He was educated at Williams College, the University of Iowa (B.A.), and the University of Arizona (M.F.A.). He currently teaches at the University of Houston and in the Warren Wilson MFA program.

“Tony Hoagland’s disarming poetry collection What Narcissism Means to Me has the appeal of a mean-but-funny friend, a smart aleck you can’t dismiss, he’s so entertaining and (most of the time) so spot on in his insights. Hoagland’s central subject is the self, specifically, a prickly, grandiose American masculine poetic self, or to be more specific still, what the author ruefully labels in one poem ‘a government called Tony Hoagland.”—The New York Times Book Review

Read Tony Hoagland on “Image out of Sound”

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